(Here below, the editorial of the n. 4, 2016 of the Journal ‘Polis’, titled ‘The contribution of Critical Theory in understanding society‘, edited by Federico Sollazzo) Abstract Is Critical Theory a part of our knowledge we can access just in a kind of museum of history of ideas, or is
Humanism apparently died somewhere round the mid-nineteen sixties. Now the human is to be resurrected by technocrats and technologists—so-called “transhumanists.” This time not as flesh, as the Christian resurrected body, but through a machine that brooks no mortal coil. This machine will be the flesh of the digital believer. Through
In a world that really has been turned on its head, truth is a moment of falsehood.1 — Guy Debord The questions that I am asked more than any others are, “What can we do? What can I do?” In the face of impending doom — which more and more
*The following article by Tim Keane is reposted from Hyperallergic. Around 1925, the Passage de l’Opéra in Paris, a glass-roofed structure housing shops, known as magasin de nouveautés, was slated for demolition. This particular arcade contained a bathhouse, itinerant lodgings, a brothel or two, small restaurants, and Café Certa, a gathering spot
Was Marx an environmentalist? My overall position on this is skeptical ambivalence. To argue strongly that Marx himself was specifically concerned with nature in a way that is directly consonant with modern day environmental struggles and concerns is going too far. On the other hand, the assertion that Marx had
Figure 1. A “sign o’ the times” offers terror-relieving propaganda during Hawaii’s recent missile alert scare.1  The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas
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